FAQs

Q?

Does Freckle Farm sell point of lay pullets?

A.

We do intend to raise and sell point of lay pullets, because we believe every family and household should have their own backyard chickens. However, we are not able to sell any of our own flock right now due to the fact that we need as many hens as possible to keep up with the demand for Freckle Farm eggs. Please contact us if you are interested in buying point of lay pullets and we can let you know when we have some available.

Q?

Where did the name Freckle Farm come from?

A.

We chose the name for a number of reasons. The first and most obvious is because most of our animals have spots on them. Freckles are also associated with a healthy Queensland image of kids and the outdoors. Sunshine is the main driver of our farming system and freckles appear following exposure to the sun. All of our animals live outdoors and so have access to sunshine whenever it is daylight. Our chemical free farming system also means that produce may sometimes have a mark, spot or ‘freckle’ that would not be there if it had been grown in a conventional system. At Freckle Farm we produce real food, spots and all.

Q?

Do any of the local butchers stock Freckle Farm meat?

A.

We only sell our meat direct to customers because we just don’t have enough to supply anyone else at this stage. Butchers generally require a regular and consistent supply of meat and so our small, seasonal production would be a headache for most of them. However, we are growing our numbers so that we do have the option of selling to butchers in the future.

Q?

Why are Freckle Farm eggs so hard to peel when hard boiled?

A.

When eggs are freshly laid they are much more likely to stick to the shell when peeling. Our eggs are usually delivered to customers in the week after they are laid and so you may want to let them sit around for a couple of weeks before using them for boiling.

Q?

Is Freckle Farm produce organic?

A.

We apply organic and biodynamic farming practices on Freckle Farm, however we are not certified organic. No chemicals, synthetic fertilisers, antibiotics, growth hormones or genetically modified feed are used in our farming system. The pigs and chickens are pasture fed, but also have access to a ration which does contain conventionally grown grain. For us it is about balance. Feeding organic feed to our animals would add signifincantly to the environmental and economic cost of our production system, since it would have to be sourced from the main production areas of organic grain in southern Australia. For us the health benefits of food produced in a pasture based system is more important than a certified organic label.